The City that made a Flightless Bird (and a whole lot more) Soar

chicken

By: Lucie B. Amundsen

laidThe Twin Ports is probably best known for a couple things: undisputed beauty and its postindustrial economic apocalypse. In the 1980s, it once sported the billboard, “Will the last one leaving Duluth please turn out the light?”

But the light remained on and recently you’ve likely heard it buzzing, sparking even.

I’ve long held that the distance between the Twin Ports and the Twin Cities isn’t just measured in mileage. There’s something nearly quantifiable in the attitude spread. Perhaps in a place with fewer cubicles to fill, the entrepreneurs and creatives have more space to stretch out; do their thing.

And you don’t have to take my word for it. Writer James Fallows in a recent Atlantic magazine feature highlighted Duluth in his article about rebounding America. He cited industry leaders such as Cirrus Design, Loll, Epicurean and our high quality of life — as noted by our hard fought Outside Magazine award win. (It was worth the callus on our clicking finger, as we’ve been on more  “Top Places to Visit” lists than ever.)

But Duluth is more than jobs and accomplishments. It always has been. There’s a certain forgiveness for late onset adulthood here. Some of us have avoided it altogether pursing art, music, sport, a passion — and our city is lucky to have its citizenry recognized for it. Muscian Gealynn Lea wowed us by winning the NPR’s Musisc’s 2016 Tiny Desk Contest taking her fiddle to the national stage. Also sharing the spotlight is our own Rachel Kilgour, bringing home 14th Annual NewSong Showcase & Competition Finals to play at Lincoln Center in New York City. And that’s just to mention two.

In Locally Laid, a memoir about starting our so-named egg farm, I write about Duluth like its a character, like a friend of mine. And one that’s been vital to our success. It felt like the community saw in us the same “unlikely to succeed” under doggedness as Duluth itself. We became the little chicken that could — the flightless bird that soared.

All these business and artists might have been able to succeed elsewhere, but I’m guessing they wouldn’t want to move to find out.

 

Lucie Amundsen is the author of Locally Laid: How We Built a Plucky, Industry-changing Egg Farm — from Scratch. She’ll be bringing her dog & poultry show to the downtown Minneapolis Library, April 14th at 7pm, as part of a panel in the Talk of the Stack series. April 14th, Lucie will at the main Duluth Public Library on April 14th at 6pm. (Disclaimer: there will be no actual dogs or poultry shown.)

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One comment on “The City that made a Flightless Bird (and a whole lot more) Soar
  1. Heidi Gist says:

    We have also found a peaceful setting in Wrenshall, just a short drive from Duluth. We moved to our farm in 1995,after a lifelong dream to own a farm. In 2003 we started our corn maze and other activities.The rapidly changing weather which Lake Superior brings provides a challenge which southern farmers couldn’t imagine. We farm livestock, corn, oats, and bay. Our ponies travel the area giving pony rides and making children smile…. And then that’s the goats!! We love it hear.

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